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Letter: Political boomerang could be on its way

The shameful smearing of Dr. Ronny Jackson — the White House physician nominated by President Trump to be secretary of the Veterans Affairs Administration and has now withdrawn — is a prime example why a growing majority of Americans hold news media and the elected hired-help in Washington in low-esteem.

Montana Sen. Jon Tester's public airing of unproven, anonymous, media-promoted smears was disgusting. After a thorough investigation, the Secret Service found no information that the allegations against Jackson were true; affirming why Quinnipiac's latest polling has congressional approval at a whopping 10 percent.

Where does Jackson go to get his reputation back? Nowhere.

Tester and news media sullied the reputation of a good man. Their dirty work reflects the time-honored Washington tradition of destroying good people. In the end, the swamp prevails, the Democrats have their scalp in Jackson and the press continues to wonder why they are loathed by a vast majority of Americans (April 26 Pew Research Poll — 8 percent of Americans have "a great deal of confidence" that news media will "act in the best interests of the public.")

Political operatives at the national and local level are ramping up yet another round of "smoking gun" propaganda concerning Robert Mueller and Trump. Mueller's investigation has cost millions of taxpayer dollars over two years and is nothing more than an attempt to nullify a constitutional election, the outcome of which offended and angered Washington's establishment on both sides of the political aisle.

Democrats wanted a special counsel to frustrate Trump's ability to govern, appease the left and stop Trump from implementing policies they oppose with the goal of enhancing their own political fortunes in 2018 and 2020. On the contrary look for a political "boomerang" this fall, launched by angry constituents who are fed up with the plotters, schemers and manipulators — blue or red.

Benjamin Franklin on June 2, 1787: "Sir, there are two passions which have a powerful influence in the affairs of men ... ambition and avarice — the love of power and the love of money. When united they have the most violent effects."

R.J. Ogaard

Crookston

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